UN rights council to examine turban ban

The United Nations Human Rights Council is set to examine the issue of ban on wearing of turbans and religious symbols in France during its current session at Geneva.

http://www.tribuneindia.com/2009/20090305/cth1.htm#6

UN rights council to examine turban ban
Jangveer Singh
Tribune News Service

Chandigarh, March 4
The United Nations Human Rights Council is set to examine the issue of ban on wearing of turbans and religious symbols in France during its current session at Geneva.
The council will deliberate on the report of special rapporteur on freedom of religion or belief submitted by Asma Jahangir to the United Nations General Assembly on “Promotion and Protection of all Human Rights, Civil, Political, Economic, Social and Cultural Rights, including the Right to Development.”
Manjit Singh Randhawa, president of Sikh Nation Organisation (SNO), disclosed here today that Asma Jahangir, in her report, observed that “indirect or de facto discrimination based on religion or belief has been encountered in the context of legislation regulating the wearing of religious symbols in education institutions.”
In the report, Ms Jahangir said “she examined a law that prohibits symbols or clothing by which students conspicuously show a religious identity in public elementary schools, middle schools and secondary schools. Although the scope of the law applied equally to all religious symbols, it turned out to disproportionately affect young Muslim women wearing the headscarf, thereby constituting a form of indirect discrimination. It also seriously affected members of the Sikh community, who reported that displaying religious symbols was an essential part of their faith. The implementation of this law led to the exclusion of children from the school public system and consequently hindered the right of some children to have access to educational institutions.”
In her concluding observations she recorded that “In many countries, religion is exploited for political ends. As illustrated in the report, discrimination based on religion or belief often emanates from deliberate state policies to ostracise certain religious or belief of communities and to restrict or deny their access to, for example, health services, public education or public posts. State authorities usually tend to be more sensitive to the interests of a religious majority community and, as a result, minority religions or beliefs may find themselves marginalised or discriminated against.”
Special Rapporteur concluded, “All human rights are universal, indivisible, interdependent and interrelated. States must take steps to ensure that, in practice, every person on their territory enjoys all human rights without discrimination of any kind.”

 

 

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